32 Ways to Irritate a Radio Host

woman-interview

woman interview 32 Ways to Irritate a Radio Host

You’ve spent a great deal of time getting an actual interview on a radio program. But could some of your actions be not only preventing you from returning to the show, but also being known among other hosts as a guest to avoid? Here are 25 ways that guests can irritate a radio host.

Make sure none of these reflect your actions!

  1. Ask the host directly, “Have you read my book?” –especially while on the air.
  2. Don’t confirm the interview until 3 AM the morning of interview, on the host’s voice mail.
  3. Confuse time zones so that you are actually at the grocery store when the host calls you for the interview.
  4. Don’t return phone calls from the host or her assistant. Instead, just e-mail her. If she wants to hear your voice, she can look up your interviews on your web site.
  5. Turn down any opportunities to be on the show unless they are broadcast during prime time. Your time is important after all!
  6. Avoid sending any press information. If they want it, they could look it up on your website.
  7. Allow your dogs to lie on the floor of your office when you’re conducting the interview and talk baby talk to them during the commercial breaks.
  8. Insist on using a Bluetooth headset. The convenience is worth a little bit of buzz on the interview.
  9. Don’t worry about being home in time for the interview. You can always call from the side of the road on your cell phone.
  10. The odds of someone calling or ringing your doorbell are minor, so don’t waste time turning off call waiting or hanging up a sign on your front door.
  11. Instead of actually answering the questions the callers have, keep telling the listeners, “If you buy my book, you’ll find the answer to this question in there.”
  12. Name drop. Every time you have a story it involves someone who is famous.
  13. Speak about your topic as though anyone who doesn’t know the lingo is uninformed.
  14. When a caller is completely off topic, go ahead and cut them off and get back to the point you were trying to make.
  15. Interrupt the host. You are the guest after all!
  16. Mention your website over and over again. You want people to be able to find you later and the host doesn’t seem to be helping you out.
  17. Tell a story that is not appropriate for the audience, making some listeners change the station. They need a little controversy for more buzz.
  18. Badmouth a former guest from the show. Surely, the host thought the same thing, right?
  19. Just talk and talk and talk. It is a talk show, right?
  20. Break out into song. . . when you are not a singer. You just felt led to do so, so why not follow your intuition?
  21. Ignore the host’s guidance of the program. You are there to spice it up after all!
  22. Insist on telling a really good story even though it has no real purpose. People need to laugh.
  23. Make comments about the host’s personality, such as “You are always so perky, but let’s get real. . . most of us don’t live that way.”
  24. Don’t look up the web site of the show or listen to past guests. You want your interview to be fresh after all!
  25. Make your offers for listeners really complicated. For example, send the audience to three different websites depending on which book they want.
  26. Talk really, really fast. If listeners missed what you say, they will buy the book.
  27. If it’s a Christian show just throw in a lot of “Christian-ese” so you sound like you are spiritually deep.
  28. Throw in a curse word or two so people know you’re human
  29. Never say thank you, after all, you are doing the host a favor by being on her show!
  30. Have a long web address, such as http://freesite.com/books/buyitnow.com . If listeners don’t get it they could just call the radio host’s assistant later.
  31. When the interview is done, call the host immediately to ask “Why didn’t you mention my book more?”
  32. Send a quick email to the host afterwards that says, “Thanks tons, all good!”

Though some of these may sound like things you would never do, many of us have slipped up and done something along that spectrum just because we didn’t take the time to think about our actions before acting on them. Take the time to prepare, be humble, gracious, and informed so that you can be the best guest possible.

facebook profile small 100x100 32 Ways to Irritate a Radio HostLisa Copen is the founder of Rest Ministries, a national nonprofit Christian organization for people who live chronic illness or pain. Through her grassroots efforts in learning to market effectively on the Internet, her ministry which began 1996 with a small website has grown to reach millions of people and she enjoys sharing these steps with others through her website http://YouCanSellMoreBooks.com .

 32 Ways to Irritate a Radio Host

8 Ways To Be a Radio Guest Who is Invited To Return

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mic2 300x200 8 Ways To Be a Radio Guest Who is Invited To ReturnMany people put a great deal of effort into becoming a guest on a radio show, however, it is easy to cross that particular radio show program off our list once we have been on the program and not focus on continuing to build a relationship with the host. Once you have been on a program and are considered a “successful guest” hosts are eager to have you back in the future. They know more about you, they understand your platform, and they know what speaking style you have so they can make their program flow even better in future interviews.

Here are some steps to help you be invited to return as a guest:

[1]. Be an organized guest

Have a template ready that you can use once a host confirms you as a guest. Be as brief as possible, and put the following items in a bullet list, so a host can scan it quickly and use it as a reference during the program.

Include a sentence or two thanking the host; a confirmation of the time of the program including the time zone of both the host and the guest; a confirmation of the time you are to call the program or the time the host will be calling you; the phone numbers for your landline which you will be using, and your cell phone as a backup; your area of expertise and a separate sheet with sample questions for the host to ask you; the name of your book and where is available (an image of your cover is nice); the website that you would like to host to mention– in a large font and bold; a brief mention of areas where be will be announcing the program online.

[2]. Let your audience know you will be on the program through your social media channels.

Find out the host’s twitter address, the radio station’s twitter address or facebook page, and use these when announcing your upcoming appearance. Include a link back to the radio station’s website, particularly if they have online broadcasting. Announce your appearance a week in advance, a day in advance, five minutes in advance, a thank you to the host after the program is over, a link to your archived program when it’s available, and a couple more mentions of the archived program in the next six months. This is easy to do in less than 10 minutes with software such as Hootsuite.com where you can schedule tweets and postings on Facebook in advance.

[3]. Make the host’s job as easy as possible

Format all of your promotional material in a clear, concise format to read, without a lot of rambling or heavy self-promotion. Listen to the program in advance and get to know the host’s style, speaking speed, and how frequently commercials are broadcast. The night before the program review your book, make sure your phones are charged. If the program is extremely early in the morning, give yourself time to get up and feel awake. Prepare 20 minutes before the program begins to calm yourself, turn off your phone’s call waiting features, take care of animals and children, put a note on your front door for UPS or salespeople, get a glass of water (no ice, it clinks), etc.

[4]. Be available

When the radio station contacts you, always respond to them as quickly as possible. If you are unable to reply to them in depth for some reason, contact them in some way to let them know you’ve received their call or e-mail and that you are very interested and will respond within a couple of hours. Also, let them know if you are frequently available for last-minute radio interviews. After the program let them know that you would be happy to step in at a moment’s notice if a guest cancels. Provide them with the best way to reach you for emergency situations when they need a guest.

[5]. Be exceptionally nice to the host’s assistant

For many programs you will never speak to the host until you are on the air. Instead, you will be working with the assistant. Always treat him or her with as much respect as you would the host. When you have questions, say “Thank you so much for taking the time to answer a few of my questions. I know you’re very busy and I appreciate it.” Few assistants hear this. The assistant may be the person who goes through the stacks of potential guests’ books, who reminds the host about interesting people who would make a good guest, who answers the calls from listeners who want more information about the guest that was recently on the air, who requests a CD of the program to be sent to you from the technical department. When writing a thank you note to the host, include one for his or her assistant as well.

[6]. Take note of topics that could be of interest to the audience when you return

Was there a direction in a conversation the host wanted to take, but ran out of time? Did a topic raised by callers surprise you? What is a point you thought worthwhile to make that didn’t get addressed? Is there an important event or an awareness day that a future program of yours could tie into? For example, if your book is on prodigal children, you could cover the topic of grief around the time of Mother’s Day. In August or September you could speak about the back-to-school days when you have a rebellious teenager. Hosts appreciate it when you provide some interesting angles on a story that they had not yet considered.

[7]. Say thank you

This may seem obvious, but many radio hosts never receive a thank you note. Although it is easy to zip off an e-mail that says “thank you so much” the old-fashioned handwritten card carries a great deal more value in the eyes of the recipient. You can also include some future topics as mentioned above for potential programs. Present these ideas, however, as simple suggestions in a way that may be helpful to the host and not as a way to sell yourself.

[8]. Stay in touch

Make note of things that you found the host was particularly interested in. What seemed to touch his or her core that you had to share? Has the host had a personal experience with one of the things you are speaking of? What other kinds of guests do they have on their program? Keep their contact information on hand so when you come across someone who you believe would make a great guests for their show, an article, or other information or resources, you can send off a short friendly e-mail. Let the host know you are thinking of her and thought this may be of use to her program. This is not the time to sell yourself, but rather just continue to nurture a relationship.

Remember that every host is just a person who is trying to do her job to the best of her ability. Too many authors view radio show hosts as a gatekeeper who can make or break their book sales. The relationships you build with each individual will not only help you as an author, but also as a person who establishes a network of people where each one can help us do our job better. And then, collectively, we can reach more people with the information we think they can use to improve their lives.

facebook profile small 100x100 8 Ways To Be a Radio Guest Who is Invited To ReturnLisa Copen is the founder of Rest Ministries, a national nonprofit Christian organization for people who live chronic illness or pain. Through her grassroots efforts in learning to market effectively on the Internet, her ministry which began 1996 with a small website has grown to reach millions of people and she enjoys sharing these steps with others through her website http://YouCanSellMoreBooks.com .

 8 Ways To Be a Radio Guest Who is Invited To Return

Writing Brings Healing to the Soul – Free Ebook of Tips

By Lisa Saunders, Special Guest Writer

lisa saunders daughter Writing Brings Healing to the Soul   Free Ebook of Tips

Lisa and her daughter

The moment I gave birth to my daughter Elizabeth in December of 1989, I felt a stab of fear—her head was so small, so deformed. Within 12 hours, I was told she had been profoundly disabled by congenital CMV (cytomegalovirus). The neonatologist said, “If she lives, she will never roll over, sit up, or feed herself.”

He was right.

Writing (and Scripture) was how I dealt with my initial shock and grief–organizing my thoughts of despair by getting them down on paper stopped them from endlessly swirling around and overwhelming me. Getting my revelations and stories inspired by Elizabeth published made me feel less alone as I connected with others. Sharing my story with others not only healed my own soul, but according to the letters I received from readers, my candid thoughts were also bringing some healing to them. Eventually, even my sense of humor returned and I found that I was able to start writing about other things.

Many writers have asked me, “How can I get my story published?” In order to share what has (and has not) worked for me, I’ve written a FREE e-book, “How to Publish and Promote Your Work,” to help others find the same satisfaction I felt when publicly sharing my thoughts. To download it visit the web site post, Free “How to Get Published” E-Booklet and click on the “Get Published” button.

When trying to get a non-fiction book published, it is required to submit a book proposal. The publisher for my recently released book, “Anything But a Dog! The Perfect Pet for a Girl with Congenital CMV,” which is about a big, homeless dog’s devotion to my disabled daughter, gave their permission for me to include my book proposal in my free e-book. Readers can use it as a guide for their own proposals.

Share your soul!
Lisa Saunders

Note from Lisa Copen of You Can Sell More Books: I had the opportunity to read this ebook and it’s a gem. Lisa writes it from the heart, but also provides some special stories and examples that will help you piece together your own story for a book, an article or more. It’s a wonderful tool I recommend.

 Writing Brings Healing to the Soul   Free Ebook of Tips

Understanding How Statistics Can Help You Build a Better Website

stats

stats Understanding How Statistics Can Help You Build a Better Website

Recently, I tried to explain to some writers for one of my web sites that the titles of some web posts were having significant impact on the percentage of people who were opening and/or reading e-mails from our organization (or not!), as well as the click through rate from the web site. One of the writers responded that this was just a “notion” of mine and that all writing should be written from the heart.

I realized then that there are many people who are authors or writers online, who do not actually understand the amazing ability we have to track statistics of the visitors of our website. Although we do want to write from the heart, we also want to reach people with our writing, correct? If you are writing an article on how to get over a broken heart, would you like to reach an extra 500 people today with your tips by using the term “brokenhearted” rather than “broken-hearted”? Simple changes by understanding keywords can have a dramatic impact on how many people you reach.

Looking at our recent posts on my organization’s website the graph of the “reading rate” looked something like a roller coaster, with large ups and downs. And I was able to track that some of this was due to the fact that titles were not specific enough to gain the interest of our readers.

If you have a website you have the ability to receive statistics that will give you a treasure chest of information. Depending if you want free statistics or are willing to pay a price for more specific information, statistics can easily be set up for any website.

They can tell you:

  • How many people are visiting your website
  • How many people are visiting a particular page on your website
  • How long those people spent on a specific webpage
  • Where in the world people live who visited your webpage
  • The trail of their visitation, meaning the order of the pages they visited
  • What page they came to first on your website
  • What page they left your website and link to someone else’s website
  • Is this the visitor’s first visit or have they been here before?
  • Is this the visitor’s first visit today or have they been here more times than once today?

With other sources you can find out what people are searching for on your webpage and if they receive results. For this with my WordPress site I use the plug-in Search Meter.

With most newsletter programs such as Get Response or AWeber you can find:

  • How many people receive your newsletter (it did not balance, their e-mail is correct)
  • How many people opened your newsletter
  • How many people clicked on the links in your newsletter
  • What links they clicked on in your newsletter
  • Sometimes it can tell you if the sale was made due to a link that was clicked on in your newsletter

One of the best sources for thorough, free, and easy-to-install statistics is Google Analytics .

One of the amazing things about using the Internet and reaching people through its channels is that very little has to be based were wrong on our gut instinct. As web designers we are given the ability to have a generous source of statistics that tell us a lot about where our site is or is not meeting the needs of the visitor.

Do you use statistics? Do they change how or what you write about? For example, if many people are searching for a particular term on your website and not finding it, are you encouraged to write an article on this topic? Have you ever used statistics to help you decide what chapters or content to write for a book, what to title it, or how to best market it? I look forward to your input on this as well!

 Understanding How Statistics Can Help You Build a Better Website

How Important Are Titles in Our Content Online?

newspaper-titles-so-important

newspaper titles so important How Important Are Titles in Our Content Online?When I was the editor of a magazine, I received a wide range of articles with titles that were very undescriptive, depressing, and even unsettling. It is expected that every editor will change titles of material and one of the keys to becoming a welcomed writer at any magazine is to send in submissions with titles that could actually be used.

In fact, as the editor of a magazine, in my guidelines are described them of our needs as “Look at the cover of Good Housekeeping and study the titles. Then write articles that reflect these topics in addition to adding on the terms chronic illness and Christian faith. This will help you understand the type of articles we are looking for.”

I recently tried to explain to a couple of writers who contribute to one of my websites that I was occasionally updating titles of the content. This was for a few different reasons:

1. The title is the most descriptive part of the message and if it is not appealing or interesting people will not click on it, and therefore it never even have the opportunity to be read.

2. Many of the titles of articles people were submitting were the same or very similar. For example, if 3 people send you articles with titles like, “Getting Through The Baby Blues”; “Dealing With The Baby Blues” and “Coping With The Baby Blues” –even if all of the articles are different in conquering the challenge of baby blues– will your readers know this? No. They will think you are just reposting the same content and updating the title (as many publishers do read books that they re-release with new titles)

3. On the Internet everything comes down to best describing your content so that it can be found by those who are searching for it. Rather than having a title that says “Waiting to Adopt” one should have the title of the blog posts be “Getting Past The Discouraging Moments Of Waiting to Adopt from China.” This is of course, assuming that the blog post is actually about getting past the discouraging moments while waiting to adopt from China.

I recently read in an article, “5 Tips for Writing Effective Web Content” by a nonprofit organization, “Titles are the very first things people read in their email subject line, RSS reader and Twitter or Facebook feed. You could argue that this is the single most important part of any content you produce because without a great title people won’t click (and the all mighty click is what you’re after, right?).”

And Copy Blogger writes in “How to Write Magnetic Headlines”

“On average, 8 out of 10 people will read headline copy, but only 2 out of 10 will read the rest. This is the secret to the power of your title, and why it so highly determines the effectiveness of the entire piece.” They have an excellent 11-part series that gives some specific guidance that will increase your ability to write better headlines in just hours.

I have also found that by focusing on a quality title I am forced to be more specific in my writing and that it sometimes takes me in a new direction and creates a topic that I had not previously planned on writing about. There are times when I have a title and I start writing the article and soon it turns into three or four different articles.

Some publishing houses now go to the extent to buy Google Ad words. They create 2 to 5 different ads and have the title of each ad be a possible title of one book that they are going to publish. In just a few hours or perhaps a couple of weeks, a publisher can do inexpensive research and find out which title is the best possible one to use on the book.

I was taught as a speaker many years ago from Florence Littauer at CLASS that the best way to find not only what is trending but also how to write great headlines is to pause at the grocery store checkout line and examine those “magazines” that we are often too embarrassed to buy even if we find the headline enticing. There is a reason that everything from the National Enquirer to People magazine sell each week even when the content itself is poorly written or even false. It’s those titles!

I would love to hear your comments about how you have improved your writing of titles for blog posts, or perhaps how you chose the title of your book.

 How Important Are Titles in Our Content Online?

How to Write an Effective Book Review

Have you ever asked someone to write a review for you and then you read it and realized they didn’t know exactly what you had in mind? There are various kinds of book reviews: those from a professional, those from an average reader, the short “snippet” that gives it a thumbs up or down with a brief explanation, or the review that goes into great depth of the book content and why it was liked or not liked. just spend a few minutes at Amazon to see all the varieties. And it’s interesting to look at the button that says, “x number of people found this review HELPFUL” because not all reviews are actually helpful.

Here is an article that reminds us of some of the key elements to book reviews.

_______________________________

By Redmond Kaniel

The Internet has changed publishing, making it possible for more people to write published book reviews for the large audience of web surfers looking for perspective before they purchase a book. With more visibility for book reviewers comes the opportunity for them to make money doing what they love to do. Even seasoned book reviewers can always improve their skills. Here are some basic tips for writing a good book review, whether for print or for the Internet. There is no perfect format for writing book reviews, but there are some tried and true methods you can use to structure your work with quality. You want people to read your review and you want to make money at your craft, so whether you review romances, self-help books or classic literature, here are some guidelines.

Before you even start reading the book you are reviewing, ask yourself some basic questions. Consider the type of audience you are appealing to. What will the potential reader think of the book title and what does the title suggest? Be sure to scan the preface or introduction to get a general feel for the book. Sometimes the introduction and the book might not seem to connect or maybe the introduction illuminates the meaning of the book. Use the Table of Contents as an overall map of the book, to help you focus on key developments.

While you read the book, consider certain things. What is the genre of the book? How do you experience the author’s point of view? Is the style and language formal or informal? What concepts or ideas are either developed or left out. Is the book stronger for leaving out or including certain points? Consider footnotes and accuracy of information. What did the book accomplish? Does it compare to other books like it?

Don’t forget, people reading your book review are not curled up with the Sunday Times. They are on the internet. Grab the reader’s attention from the start. Provide information which you might appreciate reading. You do not have to necessarily summarize the plot. Sometimes that ruins it for the reader. You also do not have to state whether you recommend the book or not. Think about what is most useful for the reader. When ending your review, summarize rather than introduce more new topics.

The more you work to refine your book reviewing skills, the more money you can make. The Internet provides a viable venue for people who love books and love writing about them. Book reviewing is an art, which takes time to refine, but the most basic tips will have you writing reviews worth raving about.

About the Author:
Redmond Kaniel is an authority on writing book summaries, working with Shvoong Summaries and Short Reviews. To make money online review information is at Shvoong.

 How to Write an Effective Book Review

New Christian Radio Show Starts 6/10 with Jerry Jenkins

Jerry Jenkins
jerry jenkins New Christian Radio Show Starts 6/10 with Jerry Jenkins

Jerry Jenkins

Co-hosted by award-winning author Kathi Macias and world-renowned artist Ron DiCianni will kick off their new radio talk show with an interview with best-selling author, Jerry Jenkins on “Communicating the Vision”. This is a Blog Talk Radio program, you can listen to. It “focuses on using every facet of the arts to communicate the beauty and message of God.”

Jerry Jenkins will discuss the various ways he has used his God-given gifts in the arts to promote the cause of Christ–including his upcoming movie. The program airs pacific time but can be listened to at any time as an archived file.

According to www.titletrakk.com

Jerry B. Jenkins, former vice president for publishing at Moody Bible Institute of Chicago and currently a member of the board of trustees, is the author of more than 175 books, including the best-selling Left Behind series. Twenty of his books have reached the New York Times best-seller list (seven in the number-one spot) and have also appeared on the USA Today, Publishers Weekly, and Wall Street Journal best-seller lists. Desecration, book #9 in the Left Behind series, was the best-selling book in the world in 2001. His books have sold nearly 70 million copies.

 New Christian Radio Show Starts 6/10 with Jerry Jenkins

Get Listed as a Radio Guest in New Publication

Did you know there is a new glossy, 4-color magazine called Best Guest Digest? It was launched by Michael Carruthers, host of the syndicated radio show, Something You Should Know, in October 2007. It goes out to about 5,700 radio and TV hosts and producers.

If you mention Mike’s name, you are entitled to 25% off your first ad.

You can see the first issue online at www.bestguestdigest.com. Click on “Current Issue.”Approximate rates are: Full page $950; half page $575 and ¼ page $390. For a free media kit email mikec@bestguestdigest.com

You may also submit a pitch for a section called ”Guests At A Glance.” This is a free editorial listing. Space is limited but it’s worth a shot. See here for details. Send to: info@bestguestdigest.com.

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Lisa and Joel Copen have a variety of experience in founding a nonprofit that receieves over 80,000 visitors per month, music and sound editing, web design, and book marketing and publishing. They look forward to your ideas to make the series of ebooks on book promotion a practical tool to help you sell more books!

 Get Listed as a Radio Guest in New Publication

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