32 Ways to Irritate a Radio Host

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woman interview 32 Ways to Irritate a Radio Host

You’ve spent a great deal of time getting an actual interview on a radio program. But could some of your actions be not only preventing you from returning to the show, but also being known among other hosts as a guest to avoid? Here are 25 ways that guests can irritate a radio host.

Make sure none of these reflect your actions!

  1. Ask the host directly, “Have you read my book?” –especially while on the air.
  2. Don’t confirm the interview until 3 AM the morning of interview, on the host’s voice mail.
  3. Confuse time zones so that you are actually at the grocery store when the host calls you for the interview.
  4. Don’t return phone calls from the host or her assistant. Instead, just e-mail her. If she wants to hear your voice, she can look up your interviews on your web site.
  5. Turn down any opportunities to be on the show unless they are broadcast during prime time. Your time is important after all!
  6. Avoid sending any press information. If they want it, they could look it up on your website.
  7. Allow your dogs to lie on the floor of your office when you’re conducting the interview and talk baby talk to them during the commercial breaks.
  8. Insist on using a Bluetooth headset. The convenience is worth a little bit of buzz on the interview.
  9. Don’t worry about being home in time for the interview. You can always call from the side of the road on your cell phone.
  10. The odds of someone calling or ringing your doorbell are minor, so don’t waste time turning off call waiting or hanging up a sign on your front door.
  11. Instead of actually answering the questions the callers have, keep telling the listeners, “If you buy my book, you’ll find the answer to this question in there.”
  12. Name drop. Every time you have a story it involves someone who is famous.
  13. Speak about your topic as though anyone who doesn’t know the lingo is uninformed.
  14. When a caller is completely off topic, go ahead and cut them off and get back to the point you were trying to make.
  15. Interrupt the host. You are the guest after all!
  16. Mention your website over and over again. You want people to be able to find you later and the host doesn’t seem to be helping you out.
  17. Tell a story that is not appropriate for the audience, making some listeners change the station. They need a little controversy for more buzz.
  18. Badmouth a former guest from the show. Surely, the host thought the same thing, right?
  19. Just talk and talk and talk. It is a talk show, right?
  20. Break out into song. . . when you are not a singer. You just felt led to do so, so why not follow your intuition?
  21. Ignore the host’s guidance of the program. You are there to spice it up after all!
  22. Insist on telling a really good story even though it has no real purpose. People need to laugh.
  23. Make comments about the host’s personality, such as “You are always so perky, but let’s get real. . . most of us don’t live that way.”
  24. Don’t look up the web site of the show or listen to past guests. You want your interview to be fresh after all!
  25. Make your offers for listeners really complicated. For example, send the audience to three different websites depending on which book they want.
  26. Talk really, really fast. If listeners missed what you say, they will buy the book.
  27. If it’s a Christian show just throw in a lot of “Christian-ese” so you sound like you are spiritually deep.
  28. Throw in a curse word or two so people know you’re human
  29. Never say thank you, after all, you are doing the host a favor by being on her show!
  30. Have a long web address, such as http://freesite.com/books/buyitnow.com . If listeners don’t get it they could just call the radio host’s assistant later.
  31. When the interview is done, call the host immediately to ask “Why didn’t you mention my book more?”
  32. Send a quick email to the host afterwards that says, “Thanks tons, all good!”

Though some of these may sound like things you would never do, many of us have slipped up and done something along that spectrum just because we didn’t take the time to think about our actions before acting on them. Take the time to prepare, be humble, gracious, and informed so that you can be the best guest possible.

facebook profile small 100x100 32 Ways to Irritate a Radio HostLisa Copen is the founder of Rest Ministries, a national nonprofit Christian organization for people who live chronic illness or pain. Through her grassroots efforts in learning to market effectively on the Internet, her ministry which began 1996 with a small website has grown to reach millions of people and she enjoys sharing these steps with others through her website http://YouCanSellMoreBooks.com .

 32 Ways to Irritate a Radio Host

8 Ways To Be a Radio Guest Who is Invited To Return

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mic2 300x200 8 Ways To Be a Radio Guest Who is Invited To ReturnMany people put a great deal of effort into becoming a guest on a radio show, however, it is easy to cross that particular radio show program off our list once we have been on the program and not focus on continuing to build a relationship with the host. Once you have been on a program and are considered a “successful guest” hosts are eager to have you back in the future. They know more about you, they understand your platform, and they know what speaking style you have so they can make their program flow even better in future interviews.

Here are some steps to help you be invited to return as a guest:

[1]. Be an organized guest

Have a template ready that you can use once a host confirms you as a guest. Be as brief as possible, and put the following items in a bullet list, so a host can scan it quickly and use it as a reference during the program.

Include a sentence or two thanking the host; a confirmation of the time of the program including the time zone of both the host and the guest; a confirmation of the time you are to call the program or the time the host will be calling you; the phone numbers for your landline which you will be using, and your cell phone as a backup; your area of expertise and a separate sheet with sample questions for the host to ask you; the name of your book and where is available (an image of your cover is nice); the website that you would like to host to mention– in a large font and bold; a brief mention of areas where be will be announcing the program online.

[2]. Let your audience know you will be on the program through your social media channels.

Find out the host’s twitter address, the radio station’s twitter address or facebook page, and use these when announcing your upcoming appearance. Include a link back to the radio station’s website, particularly if they have online broadcasting. Announce your appearance a week in advance, a day in advance, five minutes in advance, a thank you to the host after the program is over, a link to your archived program when it’s available, and a couple more mentions of the archived program in the next six months. This is easy to do in less than 10 minutes with software such as Hootsuite.com where you can schedule tweets and postings on Facebook in advance.

[3]. Make the host’s job as easy as possible

Format all of your promotional material in a clear, concise format to read, without a lot of rambling or heavy self-promotion. Listen to the program in advance and get to know the host’s style, speaking speed, and how frequently commercials are broadcast. The night before the program review your book, make sure your phones are charged. If the program is extremely early in the morning, give yourself time to get up and feel awake. Prepare 20 minutes before the program begins to calm yourself, turn off your phone’s call waiting features, take care of animals and children, put a note on your front door for UPS or salespeople, get a glass of water (no ice, it clinks), etc.

[4]. Be available

When the radio station contacts you, always respond to them as quickly as possible. If you are unable to reply to them in depth for some reason, contact them in some way to let them know you’ve received their call or e-mail and that you are very interested and will respond within a couple of hours. Also, let them know if you are frequently available for last-minute radio interviews. After the program let them know that you would be happy to step in at a moment’s notice if a guest cancels. Provide them with the best way to reach you for emergency situations when they need a guest.

[5]. Be exceptionally nice to the host’s assistant

For many programs you will never speak to the host until you are on the air. Instead, you will be working with the assistant. Always treat him or her with as much respect as you would the host. When you have questions, say “Thank you so much for taking the time to answer a few of my questions. I know you’re very busy and I appreciate it.” Few assistants hear this. The assistant may be the person who goes through the stacks of potential guests’ books, who reminds the host about interesting people who would make a good guest, who answers the calls from listeners who want more information about the guest that was recently on the air, who requests a CD of the program to be sent to you from the technical department. When writing a thank you note to the host, include one for his or her assistant as well.

[6]. Take note of topics that could be of interest to the audience when you return

Was there a direction in a conversation the host wanted to take, but ran out of time? Did a topic raised by callers surprise you? What is a point you thought worthwhile to make that didn’t get addressed? Is there an important event or an awareness day that a future program of yours could tie into? For example, if your book is on prodigal children, you could cover the topic of grief around the time of Mother’s Day. In August or September you could speak about the back-to-school days when you have a rebellious teenager. Hosts appreciate it when you provide some interesting angles on a story that they had not yet considered.

[7]. Say thank you

This may seem obvious, but many radio hosts never receive a thank you note. Although it is easy to zip off an e-mail that says “thank you so much” the old-fashioned handwritten card carries a great deal more value in the eyes of the recipient. You can also include some future topics as mentioned above for potential programs. Present these ideas, however, as simple suggestions in a way that may be helpful to the host and not as a way to sell yourself.

[8]. Stay in touch

Make note of things that you found the host was particularly interested in. What seemed to touch his or her core that you had to share? Has the host had a personal experience with one of the things you are speaking of? What other kinds of guests do they have on their program? Keep their contact information on hand so when you come across someone who you believe would make a great guests for their show, an article, or other information or resources, you can send off a short friendly e-mail. Let the host know you are thinking of her and thought this may be of use to her program. This is not the time to sell yourself, but rather just continue to nurture a relationship.

Remember that every host is just a person who is trying to do her job to the best of her ability. Too many authors view radio show hosts as a gatekeeper who can make or break their book sales. The relationships you build with each individual will not only help you as an author, but also as a person who establishes a network of people where each one can help us do our job better. And then, collectively, we can reach more people with the information we think they can use to improve their lives.

facebook profile small 100x100 8 Ways To Be a Radio Guest Who is Invited To ReturnLisa Copen is the founder of Rest Ministries, a national nonprofit Christian organization for people who live chronic illness or pain. Through her grassroots efforts in learning to market effectively on the Internet, her ministry which began 1996 with a small website has grown to reach millions of people and she enjoys sharing these steps with others through her website http://YouCanSellMoreBooks.com .

 8 Ways To Be a Radio Guest Who is Invited To Return

Get Listed as a Radio Guest in New Publication

Did you know there is a new glossy, 4-color magazine called Best Guest Digest? It was launched by Michael Carruthers, host of the syndicated radio show, Something You Should Know, in October 2007. It goes out to about 5,700 radio and TV hosts and producers.

If you mention Mike’s name, you are entitled to 25% off your first ad.

You can see the first issue online at www.bestguestdigest.com. Click on “Current Issue.”Approximate rates are: Full page $950; half page $575 and ¼ page $390. For a free media kit email mikec@bestguestdigest.com

You may also submit a pitch for a section called ”Guests At A Glance.” This is a free editorial listing. Space is limited but it’s worth a shot. See here for details. Send to: info@bestguestdigest.com.

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Lisa and Joel Copen have a variety of experience in founding a nonprofit that receieves over 80,000 visitors per month, music and sound editing, web design, and book marketing and publishing. They look forward to your ideas to make the series of ebooks on book promotion a practical tool to help you sell more books!

 Get Listed as a Radio Guest in New Publication

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