8 Ways To Be a Radio Guest Who is Invited To Return

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mic2 300x200 8 Ways To Be a Radio Guest Who is Invited To ReturnMany people put a great deal of effort into becoming a guest on a radio show, however, it is easy to cross that particular radio show program off our list once we have been on the program and not focus on continuing to build a relationship with the host. Once you have been on a program and are considered a “successful guest” hosts are eager to have you back in the future. They know more about you, they understand your platform, and they know what speaking style you have so they can make their program flow even better in future interviews.

Here are some steps to help you be invited to return as a guest:

[1]. Be an organized guest

Have a template ready that you can use once a host confirms you as a guest. Be as brief as possible, and put the following items in a bullet list, so a host can scan it quickly and use it as a reference during the program.

Include a sentence or two thanking the host; a confirmation of the time of the program including the time zone of both the host and the guest; a confirmation of the time you are to call the program or the time the host will be calling you; the phone numbers for your landline which you will be using, and your cell phone as a backup; your area of expertise and a separate sheet with sample questions for the host to ask you; the name of your book and where is available (an image of your cover is nice); the website that you would like to host to mention– in a large font and bold; a brief mention of areas where be will be announcing the program online.

[2]. Let your audience know you will be on the program through your social media channels.

Find out the host’s twitter address, the radio station’s twitter address or facebook page, and use these when announcing your upcoming appearance. Include a link back to the radio station’s website, particularly if they have online broadcasting. Announce your appearance a week in advance, a day in advance, five minutes in advance, a thank you to the host after the program is over, a link to your archived program when it’s available, and a couple more mentions of the archived program in the next six months. This is easy to do in less than 10 minutes with software such as Hootsuite.com where you can schedule tweets and postings on Facebook in advance.

[3]. Make the host’s job as easy as possible

Format all of your promotional material in a clear, concise format to read, without a lot of rambling or heavy self-promotion. Listen to the program in advance and get to know the host’s style, speaking speed, and how frequently commercials are broadcast. The night before the program review your book, make sure your phones are charged. If the program is extremely early in the morning, give yourself time to get up and feel awake. Prepare 20 minutes before the program begins to calm yourself, turn off your phone’s call waiting features, take care of animals and children, put a note on your front door for UPS or salespeople, get a glass of water (no ice, it clinks), etc.

[4]. Be available

When the radio station contacts you, always respond to them as quickly as possible. If you are unable to reply to them in depth for some reason, contact them in some way to let them know you’ve received their call or e-mail and that you are very interested and will respond within a couple of hours. Also, let them know if you are frequently available for last-minute radio interviews. After the program let them know that you would be happy to step in at a moment’s notice if a guest cancels. Provide them with the best way to reach you for emergency situations when they need a guest.

[5]. Be exceptionally nice to the host’s assistant

For many programs you will never speak to the host until you are on the air. Instead, you will be working with the assistant. Always treat him or her with as much respect as you would the host. When you have questions, say “Thank you so much for taking the time to answer a few of my questions. I know you’re very busy and I appreciate it.” Few assistants hear this. The assistant may be the person who goes through the stacks of potential guests’ books, who reminds the host about interesting people who would make a good guest, who answers the calls from listeners who want more information about the guest that was recently on the air, who requests a CD of the program to be sent to you from the technical department. When writing a thank you note to the host, include one for his or her assistant as well.

[6]. Take note of topics that could be of interest to the audience when you return

Was there a direction in a conversation the host wanted to take, but ran out of time? Did a topic raised by callers surprise you? What is a point you thought worthwhile to make that didn’t get addressed? Is there an important event or an awareness day that a future program of yours could tie into? For example, if your book is on prodigal children, you could cover the topic of grief around the time of Mother’s Day. In August or September you could speak about the back-to-school days when you have a rebellious teenager. Hosts appreciate it when you provide some interesting angles on a story that they had not yet considered.

[7]. Say thank you

This may seem obvious, but many radio hosts never receive a thank you note. Although it is easy to zip off an e-mail that says “thank you so much” the old-fashioned handwritten card carries a great deal more value in the eyes of the recipient. You can also include some future topics as mentioned above for potential programs. Present these ideas, however, as simple suggestions in a way that may be helpful to the host and not as a way to sell yourself.

[8]. Stay in touch

Make note of things that you found the host was particularly interested in. What seemed to touch his or her core that you had to share? Has the host had a personal experience with one of the things you are speaking of? What other kinds of guests do they have on their program? Keep their contact information on hand so when you come across someone who you believe would make a great guests for their show, an article, or other information or resources, you can send off a short friendly e-mail. Let the host know you are thinking of her and thought this may be of use to her program. This is not the time to sell yourself, but rather just continue to nurture a relationship.

Remember that every host is just a person who is trying to do her job to the best of her ability. Too many authors view radio show hosts as a gatekeeper who can make or break their book sales. The relationships you build with each individual will not only help you as an author, but also as a person who establishes a network of people where each one can help us do our job better. And then, collectively, we can reach more people with the information we think they can use to improve their lives.

facebook profile small 100x100 8 Ways To Be a Radio Guest Who is Invited To ReturnLisa Copen is the founder of Rest Ministries, a national nonprofit Christian organization for people who live chronic illness or pain. Through her grassroots efforts in learning to market effectively on the Internet, her ministry which began 1996 with a small website has grown to reach millions of people and she enjoys sharing these steps with others through her website http://YouCanSellMoreBooks.com .

 8 Ways To Be a Radio Guest Who is Invited To Return

New Christian Radio Show Starts 6/10 with Jerry Jenkins

Jerry Jenkins
jerry jenkins New Christian Radio Show Starts 6/10 with Jerry Jenkins

Jerry Jenkins

Co-hosted by award-winning author Kathi Macias and world-renowned artist Ron DiCianni will kick off their new radio talk show with an interview with best-selling author, Jerry Jenkins on “Communicating the Vision”. This is a Blog Talk Radio program, you can listen to. It “focuses on using every facet of the arts to communicate the beauty and message of God.”

Jerry Jenkins will discuss the various ways he has used his God-given gifts in the arts to promote the cause of Christ–including his upcoming movie. The program airs pacific time but can be listened to at any time as an archived file.

According to www.titletrakk.com

Jerry B. Jenkins, former vice president for publishing at Moody Bible Institute of Chicago and currently a member of the board of trustees, is the author of more than 175 books, including the best-selling Left Behind series. Twenty of his books have reached the New York Times best-seller list (seven in the number-one spot) and have also appeared on the USA Today, Publishers Weekly, and Wall Street Journal best-seller lists. Desecration, book #9 in the Left Behind series, was the best-selling book in the world in 2001. His books have sold nearly 70 million copies.

 New Christian Radio Show Starts 6/10 with Jerry Jenkins

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